Album: Mascord takes aim at Origin

http://www.nrl.com/a-new-origin-debate-emerges/tabid/11019/newsid/68108/default.aspx<br /> <br /> <br /> ----------<br /> Thirty-two years ago, State Of Origin was invented as a reaction against economic migration. Today, economic migration is getting even.<br /> The debate over the weekend about who Sam Kasiano should play for and the confusion of Gold Coast’s South Australian product, Brenton Lawrence, over what it all means for him should prove to us all that as an invention, if not as a cashcow, Origin is now obsolete.<br /> In the 1970s, more and more Queenslanders drifted south of the border to play rugby league because the teams there were backed by licensed clubs, in turn powered by something banned in Brisbane – poker machines.<br /> These players moved for the same reason the families of James Tamou and Kasiano probably came to Australia: “a better life” or, more bluntly, cash.<br /> As a result, games between state teams picked on residential grounds were a complete mismatch. They were reduced – by Sydney’s poker machines and more robust economy – to being played on a Tuesday night at Leichhardt Oval with squads assembling the day before.<br /> Senator Ron McAuliffe and ARL patriarch Ken Arthurson coined Origin as an artificial construct against the natural forces at work in this migration. It was specifically aimed at making Queensland competitive by sending players back across the border a few times a year – and achieved its aim spectacularly.<br /> Market forces, like rivers, may take decades or centuries to find their courses again but eventually the diversions – and the animals that build them – wither and die.<br /> The first crack in the dam wall appeared with the emergence of the Brisbane Broncos. Players based in Queensland were representing NSW – something the forefathers of Origin could never have forecast.<br /> Origin was not built for this. At the time of Origin’s – er – origins, Australian-based players rarely represented New Zealand. The Sorensen brothers, Dane and Kurt, were refused releases by Cronulla to p



Mascord takes aim at Origin

Updated Jun 18, 2012
There is no photo in this album yet.
Kaizen
http://www.nrl.com/a-new-origin-debate-emerges/tabid/11019/newsid/68108/default.aspx


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Thirty-two years ago, State Of Origin was invented as a reaction against economic migration. Today, economic migration is getting even.
The debate over the weekend about who Sam Kasiano should play for and the confusion of Gold Coast’s South Australian product, Brenton Lawrence, over what it all means for him should prove to us all that as an invention, if not as a cashcow, Origin is now obsolete.
In the 1970s, more and more Queenslanders drifted south of the border to play rugby league because the teams there were backed by licensed clubs, in turn powered by something banned in Brisbane – poker machines.
These players moved for the same reason the families of James Tamou and Kasiano probably came to Australia: “a better life” or, more bluntly, cash.
As a result, games between state teams picked on residential grounds were a complete mismatch. They were reduced – by Sydney’s poker machines and more robust economy – to being played on a Tuesday night at Leichhardt Oval with squads assembling the day before.
Senator Ron McAuliffe and ARL patriarch Ken Arthurson coined Origin as an artificial construct against the natural forces at work in this migration. It was specifically aimed at making Queensland competitive by sending players back across the border a few times a year – and achieved its aim spectacularly.
Market forces, like rivers, may take decades or centuries to find their courses again but eventually the diversions – and the animals that build them – wither and die.
The first crack in the dam wall appeared with the emergence of the Brisbane Broncos. Players based in Queensland were representing NSW – something the forefathers of Origin could never have forecast.
Origin was not built for this. At the time of Origin’s – er – origins, Australian-based players rarely represented New Zealand. The Sorensen brothers, Dane and Kurt, were refused releases by Cronulla to p

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