Album: New NRL points system will produce more tries

By: Phil Rothfield<br /> <br /> RUGBY league fans have witnessed 600 fewer tries in matches over the last two seasons compared with a decade ago. <br /> <br /> A combination of slower play-the balls, negative coaching, wrestling, low-risk attack and fitter athletes have contributed to the problem. In 2002 there was an average of 8.54 tries per game.<br /> Last year it dropped to 6.82.<br /> <br /> There has been a gradual fall for the last 10 years, although it has picked up slightly this season.<br /> <br /> Rugby league is blessed with the incredible talent it has in today&#039;s game.<br /> Ben Barba is a freakish player. So too are Billy Slater and Johnathan Thurston.<br /> <br /> Cameron Smith is the greatest hooker of all time and Greg Inglis is a superstar in any era.<br /> But the overall appeal of the game is held back by negative coaching and little innovation.<br /> Five hit-ups and a kick. Teams taking two points for a penalty goal instead of going for a try. Time wasting.<br /> Field position is more important than anything else. Completion rates are more important than offloads.<br /> The emphasis is more on saving tries rather than scoring them.<br /> So what do we do about it? It&#039;s easy to say nothing because the game has survived 100 years.<br /> Or should we react like other sports have done and at least consider change.<br /> Cricket would not have survived in the Test match-only format.<br /> It needed one-dayers and now Twenty20 games to grow and appeal to the broader public.<br /> People who have never followed or had any interest in cricket now regularly watch the interstate Big Bash.<br /> Soccer was the same as cricket. In 1981 the English Premier League changed from two points for a win to three points.<br /> It put more of an emphasis on scoring goals rather than playing conservatively and settling for a point from a draw.<br /> In tennis, tie-breakers were introduced coinciding with major television coverage to stop long and boring drawn-out sets. Rugby league needs to do something too.<br /> Traditional and rusted-on supporters will stick with the game forever, but I&#039;m talking about gro



New NRL points system will produce more tries

Updated Jul 16, 2012
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ToiletDuck
By: Phil Rothfield

RUGBY league fans have witnessed 600 fewer tries in matches over the last two seasons compared with a decade ago.

A combination of slower play-the balls, negative coaching, wrestling, low-risk attack and fitter athletes have contributed to the problem. In 2002 there was an average of 8.54 tries per game.
Last year it dropped to 6.82.

There has been a gradual fall for the last 10 years, although it has picked up slightly this season.

Rugby league is blessed with the incredible talent it has in today's game.
Ben Barba is a freakish player. So too are Billy Slater and Johnathan Thurston.

Cameron Smith is the greatest hooker of all time and Greg Inglis is a superstar in any era.
But the overall appeal of the game is held back by negative coaching and little innovation.
Five hit-ups and a kick. Teams taking two points for a penalty goal instead of going for a try. Time wasting.
Field position is more important than anything else. Completion rates are more important than offloads.
The emphasis is more on saving tries rather than scoring them.
So what do we do about it? It's easy to say nothing because the game has survived 100 years.
Or should we react like other sports have done and at least consider change.
Cricket would not have survived in the Test match-only format.
It needed one-dayers and now Twenty20 games to grow and appeal to the broader public.
People who have never followed or had any interest in cricket now regularly watch the interstate Big Bash.
Soccer was the same as cricket. In 1981 the English Premier League changed from two points for a win to three points.
It put more of an emphasis on scoring goals rather than playing conservatively and settling for a point from a draw.
In tennis, tie-breakers were introduced coinciding with major television coverage to stop long and boring drawn-out sets. Rugby league needs to do something too.
Traditional and rusted-on supporters will stick with the game forever, but I'm talking about gro

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