Album: Nrl Clubs May Face Drugs Probe

AN INVESTIGATION into the use of supplements by Essendon players is set to be expanded beyond AFL, with Fairfax Media told NRL clubs are also likely to face scrutiny.<br /> <br /> The Bombers called in the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority to look into supplements given to their players but it is understood the investigation will be broadened beyond the AFL club in coming days.<br /> <br /> It is understood up to 18 Essendon players are under scrutiny but they may be the tip of the iceberg as some officials believe the use of the supplement is widespread in the AFL and NRL.<br /> <br /> Any athlete found to have taken performance-enhancing substances - whether knowingly or not - faces a two-year ban. While Essendon officials have not fully outlined what triggered their concerns, it is believed players were administered peptides via injections at a premises away from the club last year.<br /> <br /> Peptides can be used to stimulate the production of naturally occurring hormones, increase muscle growth and strength, and increase the production of red blood cells to improve the blood&#039;s ability to carry oxygen.<br /> <br /> The supplements used by Essendon have been described as being &#039;&#039;on the edge&#039;&#039;, and it has been alleged players were asked to sign waiver forms before receiving an injection.<br /> <br /> The Bombers have sacked sports science guru Steve Dank and stood down high-performance manager Dean Robinson, both of whom worked for Manly. There is no suggestion of any wrongdoing by either.<br /> <br /> Dank, employed by the Sea Eagles from 2005 until 2010, was also briefly involved with Cronulla in 2011 but left after a clash with club doctor Dave Givney over players using the blood-thinning tablet Warfarin.<br /> <br /> He came to prominence in 2008 after Fairfax Media revealed Manly players were being injected with calves&#039; blood to hasten their recovery from injury.<br /> <br /> Under coach Des Hasler, the Sea Eagles were pioneers of sports science and tried to keep their practices top secret but the use of Actovegin - a product containing calves&#039; blo



Nrl Clubs May Face Drugs Probe

Updated Sep 27, 2013
1383  
1384  
1390  
1391  
1393  
1419  
1427  
1428  
1442  
Loading Photos......
Loading Photos......
Miket12
AN INVESTIGATION into the use of supplements by Essendon players is set to be expanded beyond AFL, with Fairfax Media told NRL clubs are also likely to face scrutiny.

The Bombers called in the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority to look into supplements given to their players but it is understood the investigation will be broadened beyond the AFL club in coming days.

It is understood up to 18 Essendon players are under scrutiny but they may be the tip of the iceberg as some officials believe the use of the supplement is widespread in the AFL and NRL.

Any athlete found to have taken performance-enhancing substances - whether knowingly or not - faces a two-year ban. While Essendon officials have not fully outlined what triggered their concerns, it is believed players were administered peptides via injections at a premises away from the club last year.

Peptides can be used to stimulate the production of naturally occurring hormones, increase muscle growth and strength, and increase the production of red blood cells to improve the blood's ability to carry oxygen.

The supplements used by Essendon have been described as being ''on the edge'', and it has been alleged players were asked to sign waiver forms before receiving an injection.

The Bombers have sacked sports science guru Steve Dank and stood down high-performance manager Dean Robinson, both of whom worked for Manly. There is no suggestion of any wrongdoing by either.

Dank, employed by the Sea Eagles from 2005 until 2010, was also briefly involved with Cronulla in 2011 but left after a clash with club doctor Dave Givney over players using the blood-thinning tablet Warfarin.

He came to prominence in 2008 after Fairfax Media revealed Manly players were being injected with calves' blood to hasten their recovery from injury.

Under coach Des Hasler, the Sea Eagles were pioneers of sports science and tried to keep their practices top secret but the use of Actovegin - a product containing calves' blo

Actions