Bridie Reeves

  1. bruce
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    bruce Warriors 1st Grader Contributor

    I have wondered who the young woman is sitting in the box next to Cappy at games. Thanks to the Warriors Women in League release I now know who she is.

    She is Bridie Reeves, the performance analyst. She started with the Warriors as an intern last season and now they have contracted her. Obviously Cappy (and JD) have a lot of faith in her. Apparently she is free to offer her opinion on things as well as the stats.

    She has played and coached league in the UK and here and has a Master Degree in Sports and Exercise Science from Staffordshire University so is a very interesting young woman.

    Statistics don't lie, they can be manipulated, especially by politicians, but if looked at honestly do not lie. My guess is Cappy is getting some interesting information. As one who has worked with stats in research I know how wrong initial appearances can be when compared with proper statistics. That would be one thing that SGH would have been well qualified to comment on.

    I wouldn't mind being a fly on the wall at the analysis meetings.
     
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  2. brightman
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    brightman 1st Grade Fringe

    But yep, thanks for informing us Bruce and as interesting as she might be she would be far more interesting if she were Head Coach of the Warriors or assisting an actual Head Coach at the Warriors.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 29, 2016
  3. bruce
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    bruce Warriors 1st Grader Contributor

    Bridie Reeves has a Masters Degree so she would have studied statistics as part of that. One of the first things you are taught when analysing stats is to spot trends, and then to question what is really causing the trend, it is a habit researchers learn. Sure Cappy might have his shortcomings but this team has been improving, even in defence although not enough there. Maybe the computer short circuited when they had to analyse missed tackles.
     
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  4. Jay M
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    Jay M Warriors 1st Grader Contributor

    She might not have studied stats as part of that. I'm not saying she did or didn't. But sports and exercise science at the uni I went to didn't have stats as a compulsory paper, only optional (and most of the guys I know only did it at stage 1 because it was an easy pass).

    In terms of the post-grad aspect, I have a post-grad degree and stats is not compulsory for post-grad in all fields, pre-reqs for a lot of post-grad degrees (depending on university and qualification) are either stage 2 stats or stage 2 maths/calc.

    You might be right though.
     
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  5. bruce
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    bruce Warriors 1st Grader Contributor

    I would have thought all post grad science involved stats, because it usually involves research which needs presentation of statistical analysis. Something like law wouldn't though. I doubt they would have employed her if she didn't have such a background.
     
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  6. Jay M
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    Jay M Warriors 1st Grader Contributor

    research doesn't always need stats though as a pre-req (not that I studied science) and I am not entitled whatsoever to comment on her university in the UK. But from the University of Auckland in NZ:

    I don't see any stats requirements below for B.SC Hons, PGDipSci or M.Sc in Sports and Exercise Science.

    Bachelor of Science (Honours) (BSc(Hons)) - Sport and Exercise Science
    Prerequisite: A major in Exercise Sciences, or equivalent as approved by the Head of Department and at least 90 points at Stage III

    Requirement:

    • 15 points: Link has been hidden. Please Register to view.
    • 45 points: Link has been hidden. Please Register to view. Dissertation
    and

    • 60 points from Link has been hidden. Please Register to view., Link has been hidden. Please Register to view.
      or
    • 45 points from Link has been hidden. Please Register to view., Link has been hidden. Please Register to view. and a further 15 points, subject to approval by the Head of Department, from 700 level courses in a related subject


    Postgraduate Diploma in Science (PGDipSci) - Sport and Exercise Science
    Prerequisite: A major in Sport and Exercise Science, or equivalent as approved by the Head of Department

    Requirement:

    • 15 points: Link has been hidden. Please Register to view.
    • at least 45 points from approved Link has been hidden. Please Register to view.
    • up to 60 points from other approved 600 or 700 level courses in Link has been hidden. Please Register to view., Link has been hidden. Please Register to view., Link has been hidden. Please Register to view., Link has been hidden. Please Register to view., Nutrition, Link has been hidden. Please Register to view., Link has been hidden. Please Register to view., Link has been hidden. Please Register to view.


    Master of Science (MSc) - Sport and Exercise Science
    Prerequisite: A BSc(Hons) or PGDipSci in Sport and Exercise Science or a PGDipSci in Clinical Exercise Physiology

    Requirement: Research Masters

    • 120 points: Link has been hidden. Please Register to view. MSc Thesis in Sport and Exercise Science
     
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  7. Johnnyray
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    Johnnyray 1st Grade Fringe

    You know as amazingly awesome as it is to finally have someone that intelligent and that talented working for the club, my only concern is this shit really necessary ? Again I'm not saying that I'm right. I'm prepared to be proven wrong about this but speaking personally when it comes to game of rugby league, it's not American Football. We don't run routes. We don't have a rule book filled with over hundred different plays that the players all have to memorise. To me, Rugby League is supposed to be a simple sport and having something like that in there to me just runs the risk of over complicating things. There is such a thing as being too smart and if there's one thing I hate most about modern game since it turned professional is people trying to make it out to be more than what it is by trying to be too smart. For me, it's just take the fun out of things. Seriously what are we going get them to do next, make them read Marcus Aurelius 'Mediations' and have them learn what it means to be proper solider out there on the battlefield ? Or Confucius ? The Tibetan Book Of The Dead would provide some real interesting results ! Hit and tackle, hit and tackle. I'm sorry but that's really all rugby league is ... :)
     
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  8. Centurion
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    Centurion 1st Grade Fringe

    You would think ay but not necessarily Bruce - there are statistical packages available that is used for quantitative research AND qualitative research as well - stats expertise isn't necessarily a requirement in all Post Grad quals - would you agree Jay M? (I didn't do a high level of stats 'stuff' in my post-grad either).
     
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  9. Jay M
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    Jay M Warriors 1st Grader Contributor

    agreed.

    it depends on the type of thesis/dissertation/research paper as well. some research papers and universities allow you to compile a summary of various other research articles in a logical format and they allow you to submit that as your own research paper :)

    In my dissertation, the most complicated calculation I had to do was divide 35 by 36... and apart from that enter the results of the actual research into a stats package to compile the correlation etc. Then just wrote it up...
     
  10. 5tees
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    5tees Warriors Bench Player

    Since Bridie Reeves completed a Masters at a UK university it is highly likely she would have completed at least some statistical analysis as part of her degree. Universities in the US, UK, Australia etc. generally have a large mathematics/statistics component in their post graduate degrees. In NZ universities the degrees have less maths/stats because this tends to scare students away because it is too difficult (apparently).

    As a current PhD student I have spoken to quite a few students who have come here to do a MSc or PhD who are surprised by how little maths/stats is covered in this country compared to where they are from.
     
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  11. bruce
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    bruce Warriors 1st Grader Contributor

    Stats programs such as SAS make the mechanics easier but you still need some knowledge of stats to be able to work those programs correctly I would have thought.
    I can hears lots of :bored:ZZZZZ buzzing about so can we agree that Bridie seems to have a good handle on stats analysis and somebody like JD who also would be well versed in the matter obviously agrees.

    The only problem would be if she didn't understand the game, which she obviously does (comes from Keighley in Yorkshire) or was trying to blind people with science, which I think is highly unlikely. She worked as an intern for a year before getting the contract which indicates she is highly motivated.

    Just imagine a first grader playing for nothing for a season before getting signed up.
     
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  12. bruce
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    bruce Warriors 1st Grader Contributor

    The Aussies have been doing this for ages. I have posted before about Daniel Anderson's interview for the Warriors coaching job. I spoke to a fly on the wall who told me he blew them away with his statistical analysis of Warriors players, and he hadn't even got to coaching them yet. My fly on the wall was a genuine old fashioned league forward who was pretty smart on tactics himself.
     
  13. Jay M
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    Jay M Warriors 1st Grader Contributor

    good all round post there. Without wanting to disparage it (not my intention at all) - some internships are paid so might not have been an unpaid one (I don't know the details of hers and don't recall reading about it so can't comment), but my internships were both paid, and two of my younger sisters-in-law both have paid internships (either current, or coming up at the end of the year).
     
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  14. t-wade23
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    t-wade23 1st Grade Fringe

    Looks like the first steps of someone being told to go all in on advanced analytics or sabre metrics if so good for the club to catch up in this regard.

    effective hitups, kick chase effectiveness,effort under fatigue,bombs vs kicks to the corner in the attacking half are all things that could be measured the data would be there and hopefully this is what her role is.

    I've always wanted the club to employ someone of this nature to help determine what kind of make up of team they want to be and how they can achieve it by targeting specfic areas in game in certain situations.

    This would also fickle down to recruitment as well finally might be able to build what type of team and what kind of players are brought into the club to help build an identity on what type of playstyle they want to adopt.

    It would explain Cappy use of an back on the bench if they are trying to go down this path.

    Never heard of an rugby league team ever using predominantly 16 players in the game and still be able to grind out 80 min performances week in and week out escpically at an club like the Warriors.
     
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  15. surfin
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    surfin Warriors 1st Grader

    I'm yet to be convinced that "grinding" out a close loss over 80 minutes is a success. Do all these stats say that fatigue over 16 players is less than fatigue over 17 players.
    I'm guessing it's pretty hard to compare when we have hardly any information on what that 17th player offers other than one less dirty jersey to wash.
    As yet only one of those games have come down to us running the opposition down, after they shut up shop and McFadden used the 17th player, all the others involved the Warriors running out of steam and being caught after using 16, last night included, is it just me seeing a pattern here. Plus I didn't need a diploma in counting to work that out.
     
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  16. bruce
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    bruce Warriors 1st Grader Contributor

    Of course it isn't, no way, but if we are to believe the word coming out of the senior players that they are working towards something then there is plenty of evidence that effort is achieving progress.
     
  17. surfin
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    surfin Warriors 1st Grader

    Is that like believing when we get told the team has had the best/toughest pre-season ever and they are going to hit the ground running.
    I'm not saying they don't believe it but history seems to show that just about every team for 20 plus years has had better/tougher pre-season than us, going on past seasons.
     
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  18. Miket12
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    Miket12 Warriors 1st Grader

    You're wrong - it is the toughest - they just like playing like paper dolls for the first few rounds to test our faith. Just once I'd love to see us in the top four after four or five rounds and not playing like they're still hung over from Christmas
     
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  19. bruce
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    bruce Warriors 1st Grader Contributor

    The preseason and early season performance was bloody disgraceful. There could be many reasons, boys still growing into men, fatigue from a tough pre season, who knows, and in the end if Cappy gets the boot it will be because of that debacle.

    If there is one thing that worries me about Cappy it was that period, and if the Titans beat us to the eight I would not complain about him being sacked on that basis. BTW I have done a ladder predictor with us losing to the Titans and Cowboys, and the Panthers losing to the Titans as well, then we lose out to the Titans. However if the Panthers beat the Titans (away) we will probably be safe alone on 28 points and the Titans lose out.

    Considering that eighth is really ninth because of the Eels Cappy's goose might be cooked already.
     
  20. Inruin
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    Inruin Walk Them Out

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    Women in League: Bridie Reeves

    Mon 01 Aug, 2016, 11:00am
    By Corey Rosser‌, New Zealand Correspondent , NRL.com


    Media has been hidden. Please Register to view.

    Two and a half years ago Bridie Reeves risked it all to move across the world and take up a performance analysis internship with the New Zealand Warriors.

    In doing so she gave up a steady job as a radiographer in her native UK, leaving behind friends and family in order to pursue her lifelong dream of working in the NRL Telstra Premiership.

    It would prove to be the first of many sacrifices Reeves would make in order to contribute to the game of rugby league, at both professional and grassroots levels.

    "It was a big gamble for me really, because before coming to Auckland I had completed my undergrad in radiography at Staffordshire University, so I was working over there and earning a decent income and everything," Reeves told NRL.com.

    "But I wanted to do this because it was something I had always thought about, I grew up watching the NRL and that was the dream to come over and work here.

    "I was an intern pretty much full-time, volunteering for the full season in 2014, and then at the end of the season I got offered a contract to stay."

    Ahead of the 10th annual Harvey Norman Women in League Round, Reeves' story is a brilliant example of how far female representation has come in the NRL.

    As the club's NRL Performance Analyst, she plays an important role in the engine room of the football department.

    From preparing individual reports and statistics on players mid-week, through to running the interchange on game day, it's a high-pressure role which can make all the difference come the crunch minutes in a competition as close as the NRL.

    "Basically whatever the coaching staff need in order to get feedback to the players, we help to make that process really smooth," Reeves says.

    "On game day I look after the interchange, so when I am in the coaching box we all talk between us and work out our strategy.

    "We always have a plan going in but it often changes in the game when players drop off faster than you think, or maybe get a head knock.

    "I can just make suggestions and keep an eye on things.

    "New Zealand and the NRL have been fantastic for me… the opportunities have been there and I have been very well supported.

    "The women who were role models for me over here were fantastic and all set really high standards."

    High praise

    Warriors coach Andrew McFadden says over the space of three seasons, Reeves has grown to become an integral part of the football operations at the club.

    "Bridie's role has evolved over the last few seasons, she has become a lot more aligned with football now and that is because she showed a lot of insight into the game," McFadden says.

    "She plays rugby league so she has got a really good view for the game straight away.

    "She has become a very important part of our week-to-week operations in terms of giving performance feedback to players, as well as our game-day analysis.

    "It is a challenging environment for women, but she has got all the attributes that allow her to excel in it. She is organised, works very hard and the boys respect the stuff she does.

    "Bridie is incredibly passionate about the game and this organisation… she loves the sport, she loves coaching and playing.

    "She is a valuable asset to our club."

    Giving back to grassroots league

    Reeves, 26, has been involved in rugby league in either playing or coaching capacities since her early teenage years, and previously captained the Yorkshire women's rugby league team as well as being a member of the winning England team at rugby union's inaugural Nations Cup in 2008.

    Her dedication to rugby league now extends well past the hours she gets paid for, and in her spare time she can be spotted playing for central Auckland club the Richmond Rovers, regularly taking the field alongside fellow Warriors staff member and current Kiwi Fern Georgia Hale.

    In past seasons Reeves also served as assistant coach for the Marist Saints Fox Memorial (Auckland first division) men's premier reserves side.

    "I have grown up around league really so that is where the background is," she says.

    "I have been really well supported and in terms of popularity, the Kiwi Ferns are really leading the way in New Zealand with their success at the NRL Auckland Nines, and in the 13-a-side game.

    "As a result people are really starting to talk about women's rugby league.

    "When I first came over I did a lot with both the men's and women's teams at the Marist Saints, but on the weekends we have so many commitments, and with all the travel and everything it can be hard.

    "But any spare time I have I love to go back and give something to the grassroots, and it's also good to keep an eye on the young players coming through and to get to know people in the Auckland league community.

    "It's back-to-back even during the week with training sessions.

    "It goes a bit crazy and I leave the house at 5.30am most days and don't get home until after 9.00pm.

    "It's pretty packed up but it's obviously fun and I love every minute of it."



    :) this article should at least spark some use of the interchange debate
     
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