General Discussion Team For 2014 + 2014 Spine Poll

Discussion in 'General Warriors Discussion' started by Lord Gnome of Howick MBE, May 6, 2013.

?

Preferred 1 7 6 and 9 for 2014

  1. 1 Tomkins 7 Johnson 6 Locke 9 tl

    44 vote(s)
    22.8%
  2. 1 Tomkins 7 Johnson 6 locke 9 friend

    5 vote(s)
    2.6%
  3. 1 Tomkins 7 Johnson 6 Townsend 9 tl

    34 vote(s)
    17.6%
  4. 1 Tomkins 7 Johnson 6 TL 9 friend

    58 vote(s)
    30.1%
  5. 1 Locke 7 Johnson 6 Tomkins 9 tl

    17 vote(s)
    8.8%
  6. 1 Locke 7 Johnson 6 Tomkins 9 friend

    4 vote(s)
    2.1%
  7. 1 Locke 7 Johnson 6 Townsend 9 tl

    5 vote(s)
    2.6%
  8. 1 Locke 7 johnson 6 TL 9 friend

    10 vote(s)
    5.2%
  9. 1 fish 7 Johnson 6 Tomkins 9 tl

    8 vote(s)
    4.1%
  10. 1 fish 7 Johnson 6 Tomkins 9 friend

    1 vote(s)
    0.5%
  11. 1 fish 7 Johnson 6 Locke 9 friend

    1 vote(s)
    0.5%
  12. 1 fish 7 Johnson 6 Locke 9 tl

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  13. 1 fish 7 Johnson 6 Townsend 9 tl

    3 vote(s)
    1.6%
  14. 1 fish 7 Johnson 6 townsend 9 friend

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  15. 1 fish 7 Johnson 6 tl 9 friend

    1 vote(s)
    0.5%
  16. Somerhong else

    2 vote(s)
    1.0%
Thread Status:
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  1. Jun 20, 2013
    Hitman82

    Hitman82 Moderator

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    May 18, 2012

    Do you mean it wouldn't surprise you if he IS let go? Or it would surprise you if he ISN'T? :D

     


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  2. Jun 20, 2013
    ShaunJohnson7

    ShaunJohnson7 Warriors Bench Player

    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
     
  3. Jun 20, 2013
    Hitman82

    Hitman82 Moderator

    Joined:
    May 18, 2012
    I find it nearly impossible to select the spine of this team, particularly with Leuluai going great at 6, and Friend's status unknown. The options are ctually crazy.

    I guess the reason I've gone with Locke on the bench is I expect Townsend to go straight into first grade. Perhaps you are correct and he should / will battle in via the Vulcans? Which of course would allow Tomkins or Locke to move into the halves... or Leuluai to remain there.

    Talk of Locke at 6 makes me suspect Townsend will be a Vulcan initially, but they also mentioned Locke at hooker - which is why I've chucked him at 14. I'm leaning towards the Hohaia type role of dynamic hooker interchange, while also providing cover for every backline position sans centre.
     
    • Like/Agree Like/Agree x 1
  4. Jun 20, 2013
    Miket12

    Miket12 Warriors Bench Player

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2012
    Teach me for typing while talking to a Building Officer on the phone at the same time. Meant to say is wouldn't surprise me if he was let go. :oops:
     
  5. Jun 20, 2013
    Lord Gnome of Howick MBE

    Lord Gnome of Howick MBE Warriors Bench Player

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2012
    Locke
    Fish
    Hurrell
    Neilson
    Vatuvei
    Tomkins
    Johnson
    Packer
    Leuleui
    Rapira
    Mateo
    Mannering
    Lowery

    Matalino
    Lilliman
    Bakuya
    Henry
     
  6. Jun 20, 2013
    Miket12

    Miket12 Warriors Bench Player

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2012
    If Friend wasn't here/available, I'd probably go with:
    1. Tomkins
    2. Fish (RW)
    3. Nielsen (LC)
    4. Hurrell (RC)
    5. Manu (LW)
    6. Locke
    7. Johnson
    8. Sam Rapira
    9. TL
    10. Packer
    11. Bukuya
    12. Mateo
    13. Mannering

    Bench:
    14. Ngani or Dom.
    15. Lillyman
    16. Mutts
    17. Sam Lousi or Benry

    Injury cover during a game would be Tomkins/halves and possibly hooker; Fish/FB; Nielsen/wing; Locke/FB, wing and possibly hooker; Johnson/ 5/8 and possibly hooker; Ngani centre/wing and possibly halves; Dom/wing, centre and 2nd row; Lousi/2nd row & prop; Benry/centre, 2nd row and possibly hooker, TL/halves. Four rotating props. Hurrell would stay at centre & Manu on wing unless really desperate for forward cover.
     
    • Like/Agree Like/Agree x 1
  7. Jun 20, 2013
    Lord Gnome of Howick MBE

    Lord Gnome of Howick MBE Warriors Bench Player

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2012
    Lowery is having a bit of a Weston at the moment, but we have to assume that he will come good.
     
  8. Jun 20, 2013
    Danpatmac

    Danpatmac Warriors First Grader

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2012
    Weston Super Mare?
     
    • Like/Agree Like/Agree x 1
  9. Jun 20, 2013
    ShaunJohnson7

    ShaunJohnson7 Warriors Bench Player

    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
    Great team there, the only thing that worries me is Tompkins at fullback defensively, I just think Locke is solid in that regard and that's why I'm more inclined to play Locke at 1 and Tompkins at 6
     
  10. Jun 20, 2013
    Lord Gnome of Howick MBE

    Lord Gnome of Howick MBE Warriors Bench Player

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2012
    Indeed.

    Surely he can't be as bad as he is playing.
     
  11. Jun 20, 2013
    Danpatmac

    Danpatmac Warriors First Grader

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2012

    Referres have really clamped down on the hands on the ball in the ruck. This also happens to be one of his strengths, slowing the play of the ball down. He needs to evolve.
     
    • Like/Agree Like/Agree x 2
  12. Jun 20, 2013
    mt.wellington

    mt.wellington Warriors Marquee

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2012
    Based on the assumption that we have signed Tomkins and Friend...

    WARRIORS

    1. Sam Tomkins - by far his best position and the position we will get the best return from. Putting him in the halves would be like signing Inglis and playing him at centre.
    2. Kevin Locke - think his article where he was disappointed that we were after Tomkins hinted at him being played at wing next season. I don't see any point having him on the bench. At least here he has a whole game and can still make his kick returns.
    3. Konrad Hurrell - if he continues his upward development he will be an easy choice.
    4. Dane Nielsen - no brainer
    5. Manu Vatuvei - no brainer
    6. Chad Townsend - will of course have to prove himself during the preseason but just like TL's signing I think he's been brought here with a specific role in mind. Namely his kicking game.
    7. Shaun Johnson - no brainer
    8. Sam Rapira - no brainer
    9. Nathan Friend - I believe the reason the Warriors don't want to take up their option is they don't intend on playing Friend for too long with TL bring the main rake. TL doesn't play 80 minutes at 9 with the Kiwis so I'm not sure if he'll go the distance with us. For that reason I've got Nathan playing the first stint to capitalise on his defensive workload.
    10. Russell Packer - happy to see him continue as Mutts fluffer.
    11. Feleti Mateo - no brainer
    12. Jayson Bukuya - think he offers more ball playing skill set then Mannering.
    13. Simon Mannering - rightful position IMO. Keep him away from the ball and just let him tackle his heart out.

    14. Ben Matulino - like him off the bench as he's been doing lately
    15. Jacob Lillyman - no brainer
    16. Thomas Leuluai - like to see him come on after 15-20 minutes and either play the rest of the game or get Friend back out there if he's needed.
    17. Ben Henry - have to have a utility type player and Benry could probably do it all at a pinch. His main role would be fresh legs for the 2nd row.

    Sadly that leaves the likes of Lowrie, Fisiiahi, Laumape, Peyroux, the Lousi brothers, Matagi and Gubb out as injury cover in the Vulcans

    VULCANS

    1. Glen Fisiiahi
    2. BILL TUPOU
    3. Ngani Laumape
    4. David Fusitua
    5. Jerome Ropati
    6. Carlos Tuimavave
    7. Pita Godinet
    8. Suaia Matagi
    9. HAVILI SILIVA
    10. Sione Lousi
    11. STEVE RAPIRA
    12. Sam Lousi
    13. Todd Lowrie

    14. Dominique Peyroux
    15. David Bhana
    16. ABRAHAM PAPALI'I
    17. Charlie Gubb
    18. Solomone Kata
     
    • Like/Agree Like/Agree x 3
  13. Jun 20, 2013
    OMG

    OMG Warriors Bench Player

    Joined:
    May 18, 2012

    I think your close but, the numbers don't work out unless they up the 2nd tier cap, but I can't see them giving what Gould wants. 25 in the 1st grade cap and maybe if we are lucky 10 in the 2nd tier, having the 2 eligible 20s players in there will help but not enough money there to pay everyone-Ropati should be retained under 1st grade cap because of the long service, he isn't eligible for it in the 2nd tier cap.
    They will be asking the clubs to foot the bill to retain these players which won't happen unless Glenn gives the clubs a new full safe.
     
  14. Jun 20, 2013
    mt.wellington

    mt.wellington Warriors Marquee

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2012
    What's your fixation on 25 players? We have 32 (33 until Siejka left) players on our roster with only Suaia Matagi on the second tier and Ngani Laumape on U20s...
     
  15. Jun 20, 2013
    Inruin

    Inruin Warriors First Grader

    Joined:
    May 19, 2012
    NRL Salary Cap explained


    NRL
    Thu 22nd April, 3:56pm
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    How does it work?
    The NRL Salary Cap for 2010 is $4.1m for the 25 highest paid players at each club. If each player was paid an equal amount, they would get $164,000 each.

    Each club can exercise its discretion in relation to how much individual players are paid, providing that total payments do not exceed the $4.1m cap.

    In addition to the $4.1m Salary Cap for top 25 players, each club may spend up to an additional $350,000 on players outside the top 25 who play in the NRL competition.

    In 2008 the NRL introduced a new competition for players 20 years and under. Known as the Toyota Cup Under 20s Competition. It has a Salary Cap of $250,000 for the top 20 players who qualify for the Toyota Cup and do not sit in a club’s top 25 Salary Cap.

    In addition to the Salary Cap for the top 20 Toyota Cup players, each club can spend an additional $50,000 on players outside the Toyota Cup top 20 who qualify and play in the Toyota Cup. Why have a Salary Cap?The NRL Salary Cap serves two functions:

    Firstly it assists in “spreading the playing talent” so that a few better resourced clubs cannot simply out-bid not so well resourced teams for all of the best players. The NRL believes that if a few clubs were able to spend unlimited funds that it would reduce the attraction of games to fans, sponsors and media partners due to an uneven competition. Allowing clubs to spend an unlimited amount on players would drive some clubs out of the competition as they would struggle to match the prices wealthy clubs could afford to pay.

    Another reason for the cap is to ensure clubs are not put into a position where they are forced to spend more money than they can afford, in terms of player payments, just to be competitive. Where did it come from?Salary caps have been part of sport for many years. The NSWRL first introduced a salary cap to Rugby League in 1990 and the NRL has had a salary cap since its inception in 1998.
     
  16. Jun 20, 2013
    Inruin

    Inruin Warriors First Grader

    Joined:
    May 19, 2012
    i think there may be confusion around the cap. this is from 2012 but helps explain a bit


    http://www.nrl.com/nrlhq/referencecentre/salarycap/tabid/10434/default.aspx
    Salary Cap

    How does it work?

    The NRL Salary Cap for 2012 is $4.4m for the 25 highest paid players at each club. If each player was paid an equal amount, they would get $176,000 each.

    Each club can exercise its discretion in relation to how much individual players are paid, providing that total payments do not exceed the various salary caps.

    In addition to the $4.4m Salary Cap for top 25 players, each club may spend up to an additional $350,000 on players outside the top 25 who play in the NRL competition.

    In 2008 the NRL introduced a new competition for players 20 years and under. Known as the Toyota Cup Under 20s Competition. It has a Salary Cap of $250,000 for the top 20 players who qualify for the Toyota Cup and do not sit in a club’s top 25 Salary Cap.

    In addition to the Salary Cap for the top 20 Toyota Cup players, each club can spend an additional $50,000 on players outside the Toyota Cup top 20 who qualify and play in the Toyota Cup.
    Note: There is a further $100,000 that is paid by the NRL to each club that goes to the player Retirement/RLPA fund. Most put this as part of the Salary Cap commitment which is why some credit the Cap as $4.4m and some as $4.5m.
    Why have a Salary Cap?

    The NRL Salary Cap serves two functions.
    Firstly it assists in “spreading the playing talent” so that a few better resourced clubs cannot simply out-bid not so well resourced teams for all of the best players. The NRL believes that if a few clubs were able to spend unlimited funds that it would reduce the attraction of games to fans, sponsors and media partners due to an uneven competition. Allowing clubs to spend an unlimited amount on players would drive some clubs out of the competition as they would struggle to match the prices wealthy clubs could afford to pay.
    Another reason for the cap is to ensure clubs are not put into a position where they are forced to spend more money than they can afford, in terms of player payments, just to be competitive.
    Where did it come from?

    Salary caps have been part of sport for many years. The NSWRL first introduced a salary cap to Rugby League in 1990 and the NRL has had a salary cap since its inception in 1998.

    The AFL introduced a salary cap in 1985 and major overseas sports such as the NFL and NBA in the USA also use salary caps.
    Salary Cap Timeline
    1990 Salary Cap introduced by NSWRL with a cap ranging from $800,000 to $1.5m depending on individual Club circumstances.
    1991 NSWRL lifts Salary Cap to $1.6m.
    1994 NSWRL approves rise in maximum Salary Cap to $1.8m.
    1997 Super League war. No Salary Cap in place.
    1998 NRL formed and proposes $3.25m Salary Cap for 1999. Cap acknowledges 'notional values' of players from contracts signed during the Super League war.
    1999 NRL Club Chief Executives, Chairmen and NRL Board recommend retention of the $3.25m Salary Cap for next two seasons.
    2000 NRL provides guidelines for breaches of the Salary Cap including fines and the loss of competition points for breaches from 2001 and beyond.
    The Sponsor Servicing Allowance was introduced lifting the effective Salary Cap from $3.25m to $3.325m.
    2001 Sponsor Servicing Allowance further increased lifting the effective Salary Cap $3.347m.
    2002 Clubs which could increase overall sponsorships were provided with an extension of the Sponsor Servicing Allowance bringing the total available allowance to $200,000 and an effective Salary Cap of $3.45m.
    2003 Long Serving Player Allowance introduced to encourage Clubs to retain players who have served a continuous period of 10 years in first grade. This $100,000 allowance lifted the effective cap to $3.55m.
    2004 The NRL and RLPA agree via a Collective Bargaining Agreement the Sala ry Cap for 2005 will be $3.3m and $3.366m for 2006.
    2005 The Salary Cap rises to $3.3 million in 2005.
    2006 A heads of agreement for a four-year Collective Bargaining Agreement was signed in June for seasons 2007-10. The agreement provided for:
    • A $3.9m salary cap in 2007 – up from $3.366million
    • Minimum wages of $55,000 (1-17) and $50,000 (18-25) – up from $37,500
    • Origin payments increasing to $12,500 per game
    • Increases in Third Party Sponsorship Agreements to $150,000
    • Reduction in qualifying period for veteran players from 10 to 8 years
    • $100,000 for the RLPA retirement fund and towards RLPA contributions.
    2007
    A further $100,000 increase to the salary cap was agreed to by the NRL and RLPA bringing the total salary cap to $4m for 2007 and $4.1m for 2008.
    • Minimum wages of $55,000 (players numbered 1-17) and $52,500 (players numbered 18-25) – up from $50,000.
    2008 Introduction of the Toyota Cup Competition with a Salary Cap of $250,000.
    2009
    Salary Cap for top 25 increased to $4.1m
    2010
    The 2006-10 collective bargaining agreement is extended for 12 months with the following increases:
    • A lift in the salary Cap of $200,000 to $4.3m ($100,000 Increase to the base, $100,000 increase to veteran player allowance);
    • An increase in the Marquee Player Allowance (from $150,000 to $300,000)
    • An exemption from the Salary Cap for the use of three cars per Club
    • Increased representative payments
    • Greater responsibility on player agents
    • Relaxation of injury allowances
    • The opportunity for players to maximise their income by maximising tax structures around image rights
    • Travel concessions for the family members of players attending milestone games
    2011 Minimum wages increased to $60,000 (players numbered 1-17) and $55,000 (players numbered 18-25).
    2012
    A lift in the salary Cap of $100,000 to $4.4m.
    Salary Cap Value
    2006 $3.6 Million
    2007
    $3.9 Million
    2008 $4.0 Million
    2009
    $4.1 Million
    2010
    $4.1 Million
    2011 $4.3 Million
    2012
    $4.4 Million
    How much can Clubs spend?

    The Salary Cap for 2012 is a maximum limit of $4.4m for the 25 highest remunerated players at each club. All other players that play NRL in the current year must fit under a $350,000 Salary Cap.
    For players in the top 25 Salary Cap or 2nd Tier Salary Cap, the Salary Cap value for a player each year is broken down into the following categories:
    • Playing Fee - fully included in the Salary Cap
    • Included benefits – all benefits provided to players including accommodation, travel, motor vehicles, interest free loans and manager’s fees and any applicable fringe benefits tax.
    • Win bonuses and appearance fees – Payments for appearing in or winning a game are calculated based on the number of NRL games the player played in the prior year multiplied by any applicable bonuses. For win bonuses, the calculation is capped at 13 wins.
      Example: A player appeared in 10 NRL games in 2010 and now has a 2011 Contract for $50,000 contract fee plus $1,000 per game. His Salary Cap Value would be $50,000 plus 10 times $1000 = $60,000.
    • Other bonuses – Any other bonus contained in a player’s contract will be calculated in the Salary Cap if the NRL Salary Cap Auditor expects him to achieve the bonus based on his prior year’s performance.
      Example: A player played State of Origin in 2010. His 2011 Contract includes a $20,000 State of Origin bonus. This bonus will be included in the player’s 2011 Salary Cap Value.
    Note:Where a bonus is achieved by a player but was not assessed in the player’s Salary Cap Value, the bonus is carried forward and calculated in the player’s Salary Cap Value for the following year. .
    Is any Remuneration excluded?

    In addition to allowances, the Salary Cap Auditor has specifically excluded the following benefits to players:
    • Tertiary education (TAFE & University)
    • Approved Traineeships
    • Medical insurance costs
    • Relocation & temporary accommodation costs
    In addition to the top 25 Salary Cap, clubs will have a maximum limit of $250,000 to spend on the 20 highest remunerated players who do not form part of the top 25 salary cap and who qualify for the Toyota Cup (turning 20 or less in the current year). All other players who play in the Toyota Cup must fit under a 2nd Tier Cap of $50,000.
    For players in the top 20 Toyota Cup Salary Cap, the Salary Cap value for a player each year is broken down into the following categories:
    • Playing Fee – fully included in the Salary Cap
    • Included benefits – all benefits provided to players including accommodation, travel, motor vehicles, interest free loans and manager’s fees and any applicable fringe benefits tax.
    • Win bonuses & appearance fees – – Payments for appearing in or winning a game are calculated based on the number of NRL and Toyota Cup games the player played in the prior year multiplied by any applicable bonuses. For win bonuses, the calculation is capped at 13 wins.
      Example: An NYC eligible player appeared in 10 NYC games in 2010 and now has a 2011- contract for a $10,000 contract fee plus $500 per game. His Salary Cap Value would be $10,000 plus 10 times $500 = $15,000.
    • Other bonuses – Any other bonus contained in a player’s contract will be calculated in the Toyota Cup Salary Cap if the Salary Cap Auditor expects him to achieve the bonus based on his prior year’s performance.
      Example: A player played U20s for NSW in 2010. His 2011 Contract includes a $2000 U20s NSW bonus. This bonus will be included in the player’s 2011 Toyota Cup Salary Cap Value.
    Note:Where a bonus is achieved by a player but was not assessed in the player’s Salary Cap Value, the bonus is carried forward and calculated in the player’s Salary Cap Value for the following year.
    Is any remuneration excluded?

    The Salary Cap Auditor has specifically excluded the following allowances for players to encourage clubs to spend money on career development outside football for players in the Toyota Cup:
    • Up to $15,000 per player for Tertiary education (TAFE & University).
    • Up to the award rate for Approved Traineeships.
    • Up to $15,000 per player towards an approved apprenticeship or pre-apprenticeship program.
    • Up to $150 per week in living away from home allowances.
    • Medical insurance costs.
    • Relocation & temporary accommodation costs.
    Are there any allowances?

    The only allowance a club may use to pay players outside of the Toyota Cup Salary Cap is an allowance of up to $30,000 across the top 20 Toyota Cup players for secondary education
    What about money paid from other people or companies?

    The basic guide is that if a player is receiving money from any person as a way of inducing him to play for the club, then that money will be included in the Salary Cap..
    Income that a player earns from parties not related to his club is generally not included in the Salary Cap, however, the details of the agreement must be advised to the club by the player. The club must then get approval for the agreement from the Salary Cap Auditor in order for the remuneration to be excluded.
    In 2006, the NRL also introduced an allowance for players who enter into Third Party Agreements with club sponsors. In 2011, the top 25 players are allowed to earn up to a maximum $300,000 from sponsorship leveraging but the total payments under these sponsorship leveraging agreements must not exceed $300,000 per club.
    How can some clubs have so many elite players and still be under the Salary Cap while other clubs at the bottom of the table seem to be just under the Salary Cap?

    The reality is all clubs spend the Salary Cap but not all are successful on the field. Someone has to come last and someone has to win, regardless of what they spend.
    Some clubs will attract players on the basis of what the club can offer a player’s career rather than just money. Other clubs may need to spend more money to attract the same level of player
    Many factors affect individual players’ remuneration levels. Some of the reasons why a player may sign with a club include:
    • Staying close to the player's home town and family.
    • The chance to work with one of the top coaches in the game.
    • Being part of a winning team and the potential to play in the Telstra Premiership Finals Series or Grand Final.
    • Increased opportunity to play NRL with that club due to a lack of competition for the player's preferred position.
    • The increased profile a player may enjoy in a one-team town.
    • The number of support staff, their expertise and the support facilities.
    • Education and welfare support structures.
    In addition, a player’s salary package may include benefits that are specifically excluded from the Salary Cap, such as the payment of medical premiums, university fees etc.
    How does the Salary Cap Auditor monitor the Salary Cap?

    All NRL player contracts must be lodged with the Salary Cap Auditor. These contracts are reviewed and each player’s remuneration is included in the Salary Cap.
    In addition, the CEO and Chairman of each club must provide a statutory declaration to the NRL at the beginning and end of each season in support of the club’s Salary Cap calculation
    The Salary Cap Auditor monitors each club’s Salary Cap position throughout the year based on the information provided by clubs. In addition, the Salary Cap Auditor may perform investigations into the remuneration of players if discrepancies arise. These investigations usually involve the club and its associated entities and cover all payments made and agreements entered into that may result in benefits being provided to players.
    The Salary Cap Auditor also continually monitors media reports and makes enquiries in an effort to uncover any information that may have Salary Cap implications.
    When clubs have been found to either breach the Salary Cap or have made undisclosed payments to a player, then the club is issued with a breach notice
    Why hasn't the Salary Cap gone up?

    The Salary Cap has risen substantially since its introduction in 1998. In that year the Salary Cap was $3.25m for the top 25 players and $500,000 for all players outside of the top 25 regardless of whether they played in the NRL.

    In 2012, the base figure is $4.4m with a further $350k being available to all other players who play NRL in 2011. There is no cap on players who may be signed to an NRL club but who do not actually play in the NRL or Toyota Cup.

    In addition, clubs can spend an additional $250,000 plus allowances on Toyota Cup players with a further $50,000 being available to all other players who play in Toyota Cup in 2012.
    Why do clubs have to let players go after they have been successful?

    The value of a player rises when they have played well and the club has a successful year. If players improve their worth by becoming a representative player, for example, then the club may need to increase their pay or face the fact another club will make an offer at his new market rate.
    The other factor is that clubs may also seek to reinforce other positions in the team by introducing new talent and football departments will prioritise between retention and recruitment.
    Third Party Agreements

    Third party agreements are payments made by companies directly to players. There is no restriction on the amount a player can earn through third party agreements where he is being paid for his own intellectual property, without the need to employ club logos or names and where the company involved is neither a club sponsor nor are they acting on behalf of a club to secure the player’s services. An example of this is a player promoting a brand or product, for example, Billy Slater and Australian Bananas.
    Many players do have third party agreements that are outside the salary cap. Individual players have registered third party agreements totalling in excess of $7.5 million in 2011.
    All third party agreements must be registered and approved beforehand. This is to ensure that they do not become a way for clubs or players to use sponsors or third parties to undermine the salary cap. There are provisions for club sponsors to enter into agreements with elite players and for details see the Marquee Player Allowance section.
    Anti-Tampering Guidelines

    The current ‘anti-tampering’ guidelines state that the NRL will not register a player’s contract with a new club until after Round Thirteen in the final year of that player’s existing contract with his current club. The only exception to this is where the existing club agrees that the new contract should be registered.
    There is no rule to prevent clubs talking to players at any time. There is an acceptance that nobody likes to see players negotiating with a new team but there is also the reality that players in the game do change clubs and that those discussions can take place over an extended period.
    Rather than introduce ‘discussion deadlines’ that have in the past been shown to be ineffective, the NRL reserves the right not to register the contract and that ensures that the player’s existing club has a fair chance of retaining its player if it wants to.
     
  17. Jun 20, 2013
    OMG

    OMG Warriors Bench Player

    Joined:
    May 18, 2012
    It's not a fixation budd, it's knowing my shit, 25 players is what the 1st grade salary cap(5.8 million) allows for only 25 to be paid from it, anyone after that is in the 2nd tier salary cap or $375,000. The minimum wage is $70,000, $70,000 into $375,000, only allows 5 players to be paid from the 2nd tier. The under 20s cap is $250,000 which why we always have u20s included in the first grade squad and now in the Vulcans, it has very little to do with development, it's all about fitting people in under the salary cap rules. The local clubs have an issue because they are paying the players that are not on the warriors books. Further-the Marquee allowance was lifted to get to the $5.8 up from $5.4million

    The Warriors have an issue with Ackland because he is alleged to have been over spending on the U20s, I must research this one because a friend told me a few days ago, that we have breached the cap and been fined, which makes sense if the U20s cap has gone over.
    Some people are commenting on some of my posts should do some research before posting..
     
  18. Jun 20, 2013
    Inruin

    Inruin Warriors First Grader

    Joined:
    May 19, 2012
    If a player plays for the Vulcans and doesnt play any NRL in that year then he doesnt come under any cap?
     
  19. Jun 20, 2013
    ShaunJohnson7

    ShaunJohnson7 Warriors Bench Player

    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
    As much as I can't really argue with your selections apart from perhaps Townsend, it saddens me to see both Fish and Laumape perhaps in the Vulcans. I know it's great depth but those boys have both played their hearts out in every first grade game they have played this season. Still....if Tompkins comes then there is gonna be a logjam
     
  20. Jun 20, 2013
    OMG

    OMG Warriors Bench Player

    Joined:
    May 18, 2012
    This why Penrith are having so many problems at the moment, contracted players have to be included in one of the caps, Penrith aren't broke and have money under the first grade cap, but the 2nd tier and the u20s have nothing left.
    Interestingly not all u20s players receive money, top 20 only,
    education and apprenticeship, medical insurance and relocation and accommodation are exempt, but accommodation costs have a weekly limit. Sheck is a prime example of the exemptions.
    The problem with Moylan is he was pulled from reserve grade un-contracted..
     
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